Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Quantification of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus in Saliva Samples and Correlation to Carriage of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Aggregatibacter actinomyctemcomitans is a gram-negative bacterium frequently associated with the development of aggressive periodontitis. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus is closely related to A. actinomyctemcomitans but despite this, it does not seem to be involved in any oral infectious disease. Preliminary data from in vitro studies of unpublished observations indicate that A. aphrophilus might have negative impact on the survival of A. actinomycetemcomitans. This could possibly depend on toxins secreted via the type VI secretion system (T6SS) in A. aphrophilus. The aim of this study was to compare quantities between these species in saliva samples collected from a cohort in Kenya (n = 116) and examine whether there exist any inverse correlation. Two sets of primers were tested by using PCR to determine their specificity in detecting A. aphrophilus. To examine an eventual correlation, samples were analysed by qPCR and thereafter compared with previously determined amounts of A. actinomycetemcomitans in these samples. Results from this study indicated that primers targeting the T6SS, i.e. the hcp gene were more specific for detection of A. aphrophilus than the rpoB primers. A majority of the samples contained both Aggregatibacter species, supporting the idea that A. aphrophilus is a common member of the oral microbiota. However, according to our data there was no general association between high amounts of A. aphrophilus and low quantities of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143917OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-143917DiVA, id: diva2:1173931
Educational program
Dentistry Programme
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(481 kB)22 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 481 kBChecksum SHA-512
aa1b68d28226c819505f9f412aefdf13b62c593bc5c387a2d591ebad0aeed10758feaf0f84ade3c2ef9c709e78cb4cdbdb74478070aeff295964efdb8856753b
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Odontology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 22 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 37 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf