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Girls' Future is Girls' Future?: Tracing the Girl Effect in Plan International Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This thesis sets out to answer if, and in that case how, the current development discourse, centring on instrumentalist arguments for gender equality and the “marketization” of aid, is reflected in Plan International Sweden’s campaign on the International Day of the Girl Child. The study draws upon critical feminist theories which stress that the instrumentalist approach, which scholars mean has become more common due to the marketization of aid, essentializes women and men in line with traditional ideas of femininity and masculinity. Through the use of discourse analysis, the study shows that the discourse of Plan’s campaign appeals to traditional constructions of femininity and masculinity where women and girls are ascribed signs such as maternal, responsible, altruistic and efficient, and men self-centred, irresponsible and potentially oppressive. Relatedly, Plan shows clear traces of instrumentalist reasoning, arguing that gender equality, besides being a social right, is an instrument to increase development efficiency. Additionally, the study finds that Plan shows traces of a marketized logic, something that can be seen in the organization’s cooperation with private companies which signifies an acceptance of them as actors in development, and the involvement of several celebrities which help validate, brand and “sell” the organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 31
Keywords [en]
gender, development, instrumentalism, Girl Effect
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338774OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-338774DiVA, id: diva2:1173590
Subject / course
Development Studies
Educational program
Bachelor Programme in Peace and Development Studies
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Output format
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