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From biopiracy to bioprospecting: Negotiating the Limits of Propertization
Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3309-3840
2017 (English)In: Property, Place and Piracy / [ed] James Arvanitakis and Martin Fredriksson, Routledge, 2017, p. 174-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since the 1990s the patenting a n d commodification of biological resources and traditional knowledge has become a contested phenomenon. This practice comes in many guises: it can be conducted by universities working in collaboration with local communities, by small commercial research companies or by multinational pharmaceutical corporations. Some call it biopiracy while others prefer the term bioprospecting or biodiscovery. The choice of words is significant as it reflects not only different ways to conduct and distribute the revenues from patenting of biological resources, but also different ways to look at the legitimacy of biopatents as such. This chapter takes the Nagoya Protocol – a UN protocol aiming to prevent biopiracy – as an example to discuss how the negotiations over bio patents also reflect different approaches to commodification of nature and the limits of propertization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017. p. 174-186
Series
Routledge Complex Real Property Rights Series
Keyword [en]
Biopiracy, bioprospecting, patents, colonialism, indigenous rights
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144233ISBN: 9781138745131 (print)ISBN: 9781315180731 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-144233DiVA, id: diva2:1173166
Projects
Commons and Commodities: Knowledge, Natural Resources and the Construction of Porperty
Funder
Swedish Research Council, E0633901EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, Marie Curie Actions Cofund Project INCA 600398
Note

Table of Contents

Introduction: Property, Place & Piracy, Martin Fredriksson Almqvist and James Arvanitakis

Chapter 1: Commons, Piracy and the Crisis of Property, James Arvanitakis, Spike Boydell and Martin Fredriksson Almqvist

Chapter 2: The Concept of the Commons in the age of extractionism: From sea to land to code, Martin Fredriksson Almqvist

Chapter 3: Property, sovereignty, piracy and the commons: early modern enclosure and the foundation of the state, Sean Johnson Andrews

Chapter 4: Unreal Property: Anarchism, Anthropology and Alchemy, Jonathan Marshall & Francesca da Rimini

Chapter 5: Piracy and Mobility in Anglophone Atlantic Literature and Culture, Alexandra Ganser

Chapter 6: An Attack to the Growth of the Imperial Body: John Locke, Colonial Piracy, and Property, Sonja Schillings

Chapter 7: Piracy and the maritime commons, Amedeo Policante

Chapter 8: Compensation in the Absence of Punishment: Rethinking Somali Piracy as a Form of Maritime Xeer, Brittany Gilmer

Chapter 9: Creation and protection of private property rights by the state: an Australian case study, Ingrid Matthews

Chapter 10: The Knitting Pirate: Craft as Resistance and Property Intervention, Johanna Dahlin

Chapter 11: Piracy on the celestial frontier? The ‘NewSpace’ quest for the privatisation of the outer space commons, Matthew Johnson

Chapter 12: Outer Space Property and Piracy, Kim Ellis

Chapter 13: 'The Ancestry Land': Land Reclamation and China’s Pursuit of Dominance in the South China Sea, Jingdong Yuan

Chapter 14: Nuclear Testing and the 'Terra Nullius Doctrine': From Life Sciences to Life Writing, Mita Banerjee

Chapter 15: Biopiracy or bioprospecting: Negotiating the limits of propertization, Martin Fredriksson Almqvist

Chapter 16: Pirate Places in Bangkok: the regulation of the urban vendor and market/mall-spaces, Daniel F. Robinson and Duncan McDuie-Ra

Chapter 17: Gated Housing Enclaves in Ghana: Property, People, and Place, Franklin Obeng-Odoom

Chapter 18: The Real Gruen Transfer - Enclosing the Right to the City, James Arvanitakis and Spike Boydell

Chapter 19: Epilogue, Martin Fredriksson Almqvist and James Arvanitakis

Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved

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