Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Co-opting religion: how ruling populists in Turkey and Macedonia sacralise the majority
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3937-9789
2018 (English)In: Religion, State and Society, ISSN 0963-7494, E-ISSN 1465-3974, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 283-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the remarkable scholarly attention to populism and populist parties, the relation between populism and religion remains understudied. Using evidence from two long-term ruling populist parties – Turkey’s Justice and Development Party and Macedonia’s Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organisation-Democratic Party for Macedonian National Unity – this study focuses on how and why religion can be an instrument for populist politics at three levels: (i) discursive, (ii) public policy and (iii) institutionalised alliances with religious authorities. The study highlights that religion comes into play at these three levels once populists attain comfortable electoral margins but encounter mounting political and economic challenges that can potentially weaken their grip on power. Ruling populists co-opt and monopolise the majority religion in the name of ‘the people’s will’ as they increasingly undermine democratic legitimacy but they need to justify their systematic crackdown on dissent, the system of checks and balances, the rule of law and minorities. The empirical findings of the study also demonstrate the dual function of religion for populists: its catch-all potential to create cross-class and cross-ethnicity popular support, and its instrumentality to discredit dissent as ‘religiously unfit’ while constructing an antagonism of ‘the people’ versus ‘the elites’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 46, no 3, p. 283-304
Keywords [en]
Religion, populism, Turkey, Macedonia, AKP, VMRO-DPMNE, democratic decline, authoritarianism
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-150916DOI: 10.1080/09637494.2017.1411088ISI: 000441774000007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-150916DiVA, id: diva2:1171557
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1170 kB)57 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1170 kBChecksum SHA-512
60854c33ed4d867e2d46426279843734d888ef9b8c22365aaa51697b4e524868f75b1c4578da07ae769bf69fcbe4e4d9c5f08a2071a6cc473fb83a24df59822d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Yabanci, Bilge
By organisation
Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS)
In the same journal
Religion, State and Society
Political Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 57 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf