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High visual acuity revealed in dogs
Lund University, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behav Genom and Physiol Grp,)
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. (AVIAN Behav Genom and Physiol Grp)
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
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2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0188557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humans have selectively bred and used dogs over a period of thousands of years, and more recently the dog has become an important model animal for studies in ethology, cognition and genetics. These broad interests warrant careful descriptions of the senses of dogs. Still there is little known about dog vision, especially what dogs can discriminate in different light conditions. We trained and tested whippets, pugs, and a Shetland sheepdog in a two-choice discrimination set-up and show that dogs can discriminate patterns with spatial frequencies between 5.5 and 19.5 cycle per degree (cpd) in the bright light condition (43 cd m(-2)). This is a higher spatial resolution than has been previously reported although the individual variation in our tests was large. Humans tested in the same set-up reached acuities corresponding to earlier studies, ranging between 32.1 and 44.2 cpd. In the dim light condition (0.0087 cd m(-2)) the acuity of dogs ranged between 1.8 and 3.5 cpd while in humans, between 5.9 and 9.9 cpd. Thus, humans make visual discrimination of objects from roughly a threefold distance compared to dogs in both bright and dim light.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2017. Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0188557
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Zoology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143909DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0188557ISI: 000417110700013PubMedID: 29206864OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143909DiVA, id: diva2:1170035
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council Advanced Research Grant GENEWELL [322206]; Swedish Research Council [637-2013-388]

Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-26

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Milton, IdaAndersson, ElinJensen, PerRoth, Lina
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