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Individual and household-level determinants of malaria infection in under-5 children from north-west and southern Nigeria: A cross-sectional comparative study based on the 2015 Nigeria Malaria Indicator Survey
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Nigeria has the highest malaria burden worldwide. The 2010 and 2015 Nigeria Malaria Indicator Surveys (NMIS) suggest an improvement in malaria indicators, with the North West zone lagging behind. This study aimed to identify the individual and household-level malaria determinants in north-west and southern Nigeria, using Rapid Diagnostic Testing (RDT) and microscopy for malaria diagnosis.

Methods

Data on 3,358 children aged 6-59 months from north-west and southern Nigeria from the 2015 NMIS was used. The two populations were compared using chi-square tests, and logistic regression analysis was done for determinants of malaria infection, based on RDT and microscopic malaria test results.

Results

Malaria prevalence by RDT in the north-west and south was 55.8% and 29.2%, respectively (37.0% and 14.9%, respectively by microscopy). In both populations, a higher age, positive RDT in an additional household member and rural residence increased the odds of malaria infection; while higher education of the head of household and greater household wealth lowered the odds of malaria infection. Household clustering of RDT-positive cases appeared to be stronger in the south compared to the north-west. There were no statistically significant differences between the results using RDT or microscopy.

Conclusion

Irrespective of the diagnostic tool used, malaria determinants were similar in north-west and southern Nigeria. However, poorer social circumstances were observed in the north-west, and may account for the delayed progress in malaria control in the region. There may be a need to intensify malaria control efforts, particularly in the north-west, while awaiting socio-economic development.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 57
Keywords [en]
malaria, determinants, individual, household, children, Nigeria, Malaria Indicator Survey, microscopy, Rapid Diagnostic Testing, RDT, malaria diagnostic tools, household malaria clustering, HRP2
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324360OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-324360DiVA, id: diva2:1169982
Educational program
Master Programme in International Health
Presentation
2017-05-31, Rosénsalen, Uppsala Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, 09:30 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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