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CO 2 Methanation: The Effect of Catalysts and Reaction Conditions
University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6279-4446
University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
2017 (English)In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 105, p. 2022-2027Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Great attention has been paid to develop non-fossil fuel energy sources to reduce carbon emissions and create a sustainable energy system for the future. Storing the intermittent energy is one of the challenges related to electricity production from renewable energy resources. The Sabatier reaction produces methane from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, with the latter produced by electrolysis. Methane could be stored and transported through the natural gas infrastructure already in place, and be a viable option for renewable energy storage. Current technology for biogas upgrading focuses on removing carbon dioxide from the biogas. However, the biogas could potentially be used directly as feed gas for the Sabatier reaction, thereby removing the cost associated with carbon dioxide removal and increasing the methane yield and carbon utilization from biological sources. Carbon dioxide methanation requires a catalyst to be active at relatively low temperatures and selective towards methane. Nickel based catalyst are most widely investigated, and commercial catalysts are typically nickel on alumina support. Focus on catalyst development for carbon dioxide methanation is predominantly related to support modification, promoter addition, as well as utilizing new class of materials such as hydrotalcite-derived catalysts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 105, p. 2022-2027
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37551DOI: 10.1016/j.egypro.2017.03.577ISI: 000404967902020Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020719363OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-37551DiVA, id: diva2:1169117
Conference
8th International Conference on Applied Energy, ICAE 2016, 8 October 2016 through 11 October 2016
Available from: 2017-12-22 Created: 2017-12-22 Last updated: 2018-07-25Bibliographically approved

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