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The birth, life and death of firms in industrial clusters: The role of knowledge networks
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Three single-authored papers in this thesis will explore the role of knowledge and information in industrial clusters; and specifically, how knowledge plays a role inthe emergence and persistence of clusters. This thesis places a major emphasis on spinoff firms.

The first paper uses a computational model to describe how patterns of industrial clustering arise with respect to the size of an initial firm when measured in terms of innovation. Technology is qualitatively described using a code set mapped on a cognitive space. Assuming inheritability of networking skills, I seek to model how the size of an initial firm influences future patterns of cluster formation through a model of technical cognition and a mimicking of creativity. Replicating the stylized facts of entrepreneurial cluster formation, we find initial firm size has a lasting impact on clustering patterns through its influence on the level of cognitive distance of the underlying agents.

The second paper turns to networks as a tool of analysis to explore the relationship between a spinoff’s network and its geographical location within an industrial cluster. Although recent literature infers that the transmission of organizational attributes in industrial clusters is accomplished via passive network ties, this has not been directly measured. After controlling for firm size, parent size and age, we find that there a statistically significant and negative relationship between network efficiency and geographic distance to a cluster’s core.

The third and final paper extends the use of networks to examine how knowledge flows, as conduits for routines and skills, affect the survival prospects for firms in industrial clusters. We consider knowledge transmission via two channels: those from inherited linkages and those from geographic proximity. It is found that a firm’s historical links formed through parent-spinoff networks have a significant impact on survival, which differ depending on the motivations of the entrepreneur. Moreover, the gains with respect to location are found to be nonlinear.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School , 2017. , p. 53
Series
JIBS Dissertation Series, ISSN 1403-0470 ; 119
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38241ISBN: 978-91-86345-81-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38241DiVA, id: diva2:1167933
Public defence
2018-01-19, B1014, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. A simulation of entrepreneurial spawning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simulation of entrepreneurial spawning
2017 (English)In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 20, no 3, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes how patterns of industrial clustering arise with respect to the size of an initial firm when measured in terms of innovation. Through principles of evolutionary economics, the aim of this paper is to examine the ’birth’ of industrial clusters. We take an endogenous and supply-side approach, where firms in a region spawn from incumbents. Technology is qualitatively described using a code set mapped on a cognitive space. Assuming inheritability of networking skills, we seek to model how the size of an initial firm influences future patterns of cluster formation through a model of technical cognition and a mimicking of creativity. It is found that initial firm size has a lasting impact on clustering patterns through its influence on the level of cognitive distance of the underlying agents. The model replicates the stylised facts of entrepreneurial cluster formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Surrey, 2017
Keyword
Evolutionary economic geography, Industrial clusters, Schumpeter, Spin-offs, Technological change
National Category
Economic Geography Business Administration Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37208 (URN)10.18564/jasss.3444 (DOI)000416163500013 ()2-s2.0-85021953991 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-01-23Bibliographically approved
2. Networks in clusters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Networks in clusters
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There is a multitude of studies that examine the performance of firms within industrial clusters. The organizational attributes inherited by spinoffs from parent firms is one explanation behind performance premiums. This paper examines the relationship between a spinoff’s network and its geographical location in an industrial cluster. We hypothesize that there is a negative relationship between a spinoff’s network efficiency and its distance from the cluster’s centroid. Although recent literature infers that the transmission of knowledge in industrial clusters is accomplished via passive network ties, this has not been directly measured. This paper aims to fill that research gap. We find that, after controlling for firm size, parent size and age, there is indeed a statistically significant and negative relationship between network efficiency and geographic distance to a cluster’ score.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38237 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
3. Networks, geography, and the survival of the firm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Networks, geography, and the survival of the firm
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Prior studies show that the success of firms in industrial clusters is the result of two main reasons; the transfer of knowledge and routines from parent firms to spinoffs that locate in the same locality, and the returns from co-location. While previous research has largely inferred the presence of parent-spinoff networks, few studies have measured them. Furthermore, the lack of geographic precision has led to conflicting results for evidence of returns from location, as the gains from geographic proximity may not always be linear. This paper introduces network measurement and a refined geographic measure to separate these two respective channels of knowledge transfer, and analyzes their impact on firm survival (as a proxy for firm success). It is found that the gains with respect to location are nonlinear. Furthermore, a firm’s historical links formed through parent-spinoff linkages have a significant impact on survival, which differ depending on the motivations of the entrepreneur. Moreover, these channels of knowledge are complementary in nature.

Keyword
Industrial clusters, spin-offs, knowledge flows Schumpeter
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38238 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved

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