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Prevalence of mind and body exercises (MBE) in relation to demographics, self-rated health, and purchases of prescribed psychotropic drugs and analgesics
Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stress Clin, Stockholm, Sweden..
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 9, article id e0184635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to identify any differences regarding gender, age, socioeconomic status (SES), self-rated health, perceived stress and the purchase of prescribed drugs among people who practice mind and body exercises (MBE) extensively compared to people who do not. Methods: The study includes 3,913 men and 4,803 women aged 20-72 who participated in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). The respondents were divided into three groups depending on frequency of MBE practice (never/seldom/often). Measures regarding MBE practice, health behaviors, self-rated health, and illnesses were drawn from the SLOSH questionnaire, while more objective measures of socioeconomic status and education were derived from registry data. In addition, data on purchases of prescription drugs for all respondents were included in the study. These data were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, which contains information about prescription drugs dispensed at Swedish pharmacies. Separate analyses were performed for mental MBE (mindfulness, meditation, relaxation techniques) and physical MBE (yoga, Tai Chi, Qi Gong), respectively. Results: A high intensity MBE practice is cross-sectionally related to poor self-assessed health (sleeping problems, pain, depressive symptoms, mental disorders), high levels of stress, and high levels of purchases of psychotropic drugs and analgesics. These cross-sectional relationships are generally stronger for mental MBE than for bodily-directed MBE. More women than men are practicing MBE on a regular basis, and physically active people participate to a greater extent in MBE compared with the physically inactive. Conclusion: Overall, the study shows that frequent participation in mind and body exercises is associated with high levels of purchases of psychotropic drugs and analgesics as well as with poor self-assessed health and high levels of stress. However, since this is a cross-sectional study, it is impossible to establish cause and effect, and to further investigate the associations found; longitudinal studies that can account for temporality between covariates and MBE use are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2017. Vol. 12, no 9, article id e0184635
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336046DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184635ISI: 000410861600013PubMedID: 28915274OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-336046DiVA, id: diva2:1165296
Funder
Ekhaga Foundation, 2013-58The Kempe FoundationsAvailable from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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