Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effectiveness of Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) versus standard occupational therapy for activity engagement and functioning among people with mental illness - a cluster RCT study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
2017 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Many with a mental illness have an impoverished everyday life with few meaningful activities and a sedentary lifestyle. The study aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 16-week Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) program, compared to care as usual (CAU), for people with mental illness in specialized and community-based psychiatric services. The main outcomes concerned different aspects of subjectively evaluated everyday activities, in terms of the engagement and satisfaction they bring, balance among activities, and activity level. Secondary outcomes pertained to various facets of well-being and functioning. It was hypothesized that those who received the BEL intervention would improve more than the comparison group regarding activity, well-being and functioning outcomes.

Methods: BEL is a group and activity-based lifestyle intervention. CAU entailed active support, mainly standard occupational therapy. The BEL group included 133 participants and the CAU group 93. They completed self-report questionnaires targeting activity and well-being on three occasions – at baseline, after completed intervention (at 16 weeks) and at a six-month follow-up. A research assistant rated the participants’ level of functioning and symptom severity on the same occasions. Non-parametric statistics were used since these instruments produced ordinal data.

Results: The BEL group improved more than the CAU group from baseline to 16 weeks on primary outcomes in terms of activity engagement (p < 0.001), activity level (p = 0.036) and activity balance (p < 0.042). The BEL group also improved more on the secondary outcomes of symptom severity (p < 0.018) and level of functioning (p < 0.046) from baseline to 16 weeks, but not on well-being. High intra-class correlations (0.12–0.22) indicated clustering effects for symptom severity and level of functioning. The group differences on activity engagement (p = 0.001) and activity level (p = 0.007) remained at the follow-up. The BEL group also improved their well-being (quality of life) more than the CAU group from baseline to the follow-up (p = 0.049). No differences were found at that time for activity balance, level of functioning and symptom severity.

Conclusion: The BEL program was effective compared to CAU in terms of activity engagement. Their improvements were not, however, greater concerning other subjective perceptions, such as satisfaction with daily activities and self-rated health, and clustering effects lowered the dependability regarding findings of improvements on symptoms and functioning. Although the CAU group had “caught up” at the follow-up, the BEL group had improved more on general quality of life. BEL appeared to be important in shortening the time required for participants to develop their engagement in activity and in attaining improved quality of life in a follow-up perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD , 2017. Vol. 17, article id 363
Keywords [en]
Disability, Life style, Personal satisfaction, Occupational therapy, Recovery, Schizophrenia, Mood sorder
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142240DOI: 10.1186/s12888-017-1524-7ISI: 000414864400002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-142240DiVA, id: diva2:1164666
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-20,067-09-4Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(693 kB)31 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 693 kBChecksum SHA-512
e24bd361f7742f64bcca9c73b1e5905573532220e5d2f4bea190604e1f1d7e4a7037d287c81dba7b0ca5bc37a3bafc6ed375f251545aa1a0f203158f9031b776
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sandlund, Mikael
By organisation
Psychiatry
In the same journal
BMC Psychiatry
Occupational Therapy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 31 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 289 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf