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A comparative review of viral entry and attachment during large and giant dsDNA virus infections
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
2017 (English)In: Archives of Virology, ISSN 0304-8608, E-ISSN 1432-8798, Vol. 162, no 12, p. 3567-3585Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Viruses enter host cells via several mechanisms, including endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis. They can also fuse at the plasma membrane and can spread within the host via cell-to-cell fusion or syncytia. The mechanism used by a given viral strain depends on its external topology and proteome and the type of cell being entered. This comparative review discusses the cellular attachment receptors and entry pathways of dsDNA viruses belonging to the families Adenoviridae, Baculoviridae, Herpesviridae and nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) belonging to the families Ascoviridae, Asfarviridae, Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, and Poxviridae, and giant viruses belonging to the families Mimiviridae and Marseilleviridae as well as the proposed families Pandoraviridae and Pithoviridae. Although these viruses have several common features (e.g., topology, replication and protein sequence similarities) they utilize different entry pathways to infect wide-range of hosts, including humans, other mammals, invertebrates, fish, protozoa and algae. Similarities and differences between the entry methods used by these virus families are highlighted, with particular emphasis on viral topology and proteins that mediate viral attachment and entry. Cell types that are frequently used to study viral entry are also reviewed, along with other factors that affect virus-host cell interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER WIEN , 2017. Vol. 162, no 12, p. 3567-3585
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142231DOI: 10.1007/s00705-017-3497-8ISI: 000414448700001PubMedID: 28866775OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-142231DiVA, id: diva2:1164640
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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