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How to respond to resistiveness towards assistive technologies among persons with dementia
Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Culture and Aesthetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics.
2018 (English)In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 411-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is a common experience among care professionals that persons with dementia often say ‘no’ to conventional caring measures such as taking medication, eating or having a shower. This tendency to say ‘no’ may also concern the use of assistive technologies such as fall detectors, mobile safety alarms, Internet for social contact and robots. This paper provides practical recommendations for care professionals in home health care and social care about how to respond to such resistiveness towards assistive technologies. Apart from the option of accepting the ‘no’, it discusses a number of methods for influencing persons with dementia in order to overcome the ‘no’. These methods range from various non-coercive measures—including nudging—to coercion. It is argued that while conventional caring measures like those mentioned are essential for survival, health or hygiene, assistive technologies are commonly merely potentially beneficial supplements. With this in mind, it is concluded that care professionals should be more restrictive in using methods of influence involving some degree of pressure regarding assistive technologies than regarding conventional caring measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018. Vol. 21, no 3, p. 411-421
Keywords [en]
Assistive technologies Autonomy Best interest Dementia Nudging Resistiveness
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143422DOI: 10.1007/s11019-017-9816-8ISI: 000441119400014PubMedID: 29214555Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85037102000OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-143422DiVA, id: diva2:1163227
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-08-24

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