Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in blue tit nestlings (Cyanistis caeruleus) under contrasting rearing conditions
Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Gronostajowa 7, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Evolutionary Ecology, ISSN 0269-7653, E-ISSN 1573-8477, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 803-814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the relation between genetic variation and fitness remains a key question in evolutionary biology. Although heterozygosity has been reported to correlate with many fitness-related traits, the strength of the heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) is usually weak and it is still difficult to assess the generality of these associations in natural populations. It has been suggested that HFCs may become meaningful only under particular environmental conditions. Moreover, existing evidence suggests that HFCs may also differ between sexes. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between heterozygosity in neutral markers (microsatellites) and fitness-related traits in a natural population of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Additionally, we tested whether sex and environmental conditions may influence the magnitude and direction of HFCs. We found a positive relationship between heterozygosity and body mass of 14 days post-hatching nestlings, but only among females. Our results suggest that the correlation between heterozygosity and nestling body mass observed among female offspring could be attributed to within-brood effects. We failed to find any evidence that environmental conditions as simulated by brood size manipulation affect HFCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2017. Vol. 31, no 5, p. 803-814
Keyword [en]
HFCs, Genetic diversity, Birds, Cell-mediated immunity, Context dependence
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335123DOI: 10.1007/s10682-017-9911-6ISI: 000410764000014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-335123DiVA, id: diva2:1162366
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(431 kB)6 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 431 kBChecksum SHA-512
a5d983753260a4fa31556a1fd34211e5bd1c72d6e7304f92d91181d7718c0aa1956996d6aac45b5db0bf1584bb4f0e8f58598d2b935d8a506da5d14ea847514c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gustafsson, Lars
By organisation
Animal ecology
In the same journal
Evolutionary Ecology
Evolutionary Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 6 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 75 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf