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Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Aspects of follow-up and complications
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery. (kärlkirurgi)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6156-8669
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the procedure of choice in most patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. The drawbacks of EVAR are a higher rate of complications and frequent need for reinterventions, requiring regular postoperative follow-up. Non-stratified follow-up may have a deleterious effect on patients and the health care system. The aim of this thesis is to develop strategies that can stratify the EVAR follow-up programme according to an individual patient´s risk profile.

Study I, an international multicentre study of all abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients with EVAR in three centres (2000 to 2011) demonstrated a lower rate of late complications and reinterventions in patients with sac shrinkage during the first postoperative year, compared to the non-shrinkage group.

Study II, an international multicentre study of patients treated for a ruptured aortic aneurysm with EVAR in three centres (2000 to 2012) demonstrated that ruptured EVAR (rEVAR) in patients with hostile anatomy is associated with a high rate of graft-related complications, reinterventions and increased overall mortality.

Study III, a two-centre cohort study of 326 patients with EVAR (2001 to 2012), with first postoperative computerised tomographic angiography (CTA) within one year of the operation. Patients with adequate proximal and distal sealing zones and no endoleak in the first postoperative CTA had significantly lower risk for AAA-related complications and reinterventions up to five years postoperatively.

Study IV, studied all complications and reinterventions in a two-centre cohort study of all EVAR patients (1998 to 2012), One-fourth of the patients in the study developed complications during a mean follow-up of five years. Most complications were asymptomatic imaging-detected. Ultrasound could detect most of the clinically significant complications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018. , p. 89
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1402
Keywords [en]
abdominal aortic aneurysm, EVAR, rEVAR surveillance
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334369ISBN: 978-91-513-0167-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-334369DiVA, id: diva2:1159553
Public defence
2018-01-19, Gustavianum, Akademigatan 3, 753 10 Uppsala, Sverige, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-12-22 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-03-08
List of papers
1. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair
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2014 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 101, no 7, p. 802-810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods: Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6-18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results: Some 597 EVARs (71.1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47.6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5-9mm) in 142 (23.8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10mm) in 171 patients (28.6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84.3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78.7 to 89.8), 88.1 (80.6 to 95.5) and 94.4 (90.1 to 98.7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3.11; P < 0.001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2.10; P = 0.022), early postoperative complications (HR 3.34; P < 0.001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1.02; P = 0.001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion: Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance.

National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228003 (URN)10.1002/bjs.9516 (DOI)000335648000010 ()
Available from: 2014-07-03 Created: 2014-07-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
2. Challenging Anatomy Predicts Mortality and Complications After Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging Anatomy Predicts Mortality and Complications After Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Endovascular Therapy, ISSN 1526-6028, E-ISSN 1545-1550, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 919-927Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To analyze the effects of aortic anatomy and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) inside and outside the instructions for use (IFU) on outcomes in patients treated for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA).

METHODS: All 112 patients (mean age 73 years; 102 men) treated with standard EVAR for rAAA between 2000 and 2012 in 3 European centers were included in the retrospective analysis. Patients were grouped based on aortic anatomy and whether EVAR was performed inside or outside the IFU. Data on complications, secondary interventions, and mortality were extracted from the patient records. Cox regression analysis was performed to assess predictors of mortality and complications; results are presented as the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method.

RESULTS: Of the 112 patients examined, 61 (54%) were treated inside the IFU, 43 (38%) outside the IFU, and 8 patients lacked adequate preoperative computed tomography scans for determination. Median follow-up of those surviving 30 days was 2.5 years. Mortality at 30 days was 15% (95% CI 6% to 24%) inside the IFU vs 30% (95% CI 16% to 45%) outside (p=0.087). Three-year mortality estimates were 33.8% (95% CI 20.0% to 47.5%) inside the IFU vs 56% (95% CI 39.7% to 72.2%) outside (p=0.016). At 5 years, mortality was 48% (95% CI 30% to 66%) inside the IFU vs 74% (95% CI 54% to 93%) outside (p=0.015). Graft-related complications occurred in 6% (95% CI 0% to 13%) inside the IFU and 30% (95% CI 14% to 42%) outside (p=0.015). The rate of graft-related secondary interventions was 14% (95% CI 4% to 22%) inside the IFU vs 35% (95% CI 14% to 42%) outside (p=0.072). In the multivariate analysis, neck length <15 mm (HR 8.1, 95% CI 3.0 to 21.9, p<0.001) and angulation >60° (HR 3.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 9.3, p=0.045) were independent predictors of late graft-related complications. Aneurysm neck diameter >29 mm (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.9, p=0.035) was an independent predictor of overall mortality.

CONCLUSION: Long-term mortality and complications after rEVAR are associated with aneurysm anatomy. The role of adjunct endovascular techniques and the outcome of open repair in cases with challenging anatomy warrant further study.

Keywords
abdominal aortic aneurysm, complications, endovascular aneurysm repair, instructions for use, mortality, neck angulation, neck diameter, neck length, secondary interventions, stent-graft
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308343 (URN)10.1177/1526602816658494 (DOI)000387483900012 ()27385153 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-24 Created: 2016-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
3. Follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair can be stratified based on first postoperative imaging
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair can be stratified based on first postoperative imaging
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 05, no 6, p. 709-718Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Lifelong postoperative surveillance is recommended following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Although the purpose is to prevent and/or identify complications early, it also results in increased cost and workload. This study was designed to examine whether it may be possible to identify patients at low risk of complications based on their first postoperative CT angiogram (CTA).

Methods

All patients undergoing EVAR in two Swedish centres between 2001 and 2012 were identified retrospectively and categorized based on the first postoperative CTA as at low risk (proximal and distal sealing zone at least 10 mm and no endoleak) or high risk (sealing zone less than 10 mm and/or presence of any endoleak) of complications.

Results

Some 326 patients (273 men) with a CTA performed less than 1 year after EVAR were included (low risk 212, 65·0 per cent; high risk 114, 35·0 per cent). There was no difference between the groups in terms of sex, age, co‐morbidities, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameter, preoperative AAA neck anatomy, stent‐graft type or duration of follow‐up (mean(s.d.) 4·8(3·2) years). Five‐year freedom from AAA‐related adverse events was 97·1 and 47·7 per cent in the low‐ and high‐risk groups respectively (P < 0·001). The corresponding freedom from AAA‐related reintervention was 96·2 and 54·1 per cent (P < 0·001). The method had a sensitivity of 88·3 per cent, specificity of 77·0 per cent and negative predictive value of 96·6 per cent to detect AAA‐related adverse events. The number of surveillance imaging per AAA‐related adverse event was 168 versus 11 for the low‐risk versus high‐risk group.

Conclusion

Two‐thirds of patients undergoing EVAR have an adequate seal and no endoleak on the first postoperative CTA, and a very low risk of AAA‐related events up to 5 years. Less vigilant follow‐up after EVAR may be considered for these patients.

National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334332 (URN)10.1002/bjs.10766 (DOI)000430058000014 ()
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
4. Detection of late complications after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and implications for follow-up
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of late complications after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and implications for follow-up
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334329 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04

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