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Local interactions and global properties of wild, free-ranging stickleback shoals
Univ Sydney, Sch Life & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
Univ Sydney, Sch Life & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Univ New England, Sch Sci & Technol, Armidale, NSW, Australia..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics. Stockholm Univ, Dept Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
Univ Hull, Sch Biol Biomed & Environm Sci, Kingston Upon Hull, N Humberside, England..
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2017 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 4, no 7, 170043Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collective motion describes the global properties of moving groups of animals and the self-organized, coordinated patterns of individual behaviour that produce them. We examined the group-level patterns and local interactions between individuals in wild, free-ranging shoals of three-spine sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. Our data reveal that the highest frequencies of near-neighbour encounters occur at between one and two body lengths from a focal fish, with the peak frequency alongside a focal individual. Fish also show the highest alignment with these laterally placed individuals, and generally with animals in front of themselves. Furthermore, fish are more closely matched in size, speed and orientation to their near neighbours than to more distant neighbours, indicating local organization within groups. Among the group-level properties reported here, we find that polarization is strongly influenced by group speed, but also the variation in speed among individuals and the nearest neighbour distances of group members. While we find no relationship between group order and group size, we do find that larger groups tend to have lower nearest neighbour distances, which in turn may be important in maintaining group order.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC , 2017. Vol. 4, no 7, 170043
Keyword [en]
collective behaviour, schooling, grouping
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333406DOI: 10.1098/rsos.170043ISI: 000406670000024PubMedID: 28791135OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-333406DiVA: diva2:1156615
Funder
Australian Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2017-11-13Bibliographically approved

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Sumpter, David J. T.

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