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Wolf and Bear Depredation on Livestock in Northern Sweden 1827-2014: Combining History, Ecology and Interviews
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
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2017 (English)In: Land, ISSN 2073-445X, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 6, no 3, 63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the twenty-first century, large carnivores have increased in human dominated landscapes after being extinct or nearly extinct. This has resulted in increasing numbers of livestock killed by large carnivores. The intent of this paper is to give a land use-historical perspective on the recent livestock-carnivore conflict in boreal Sweden. More specifically we address: (1) depredation risks (livestock killed by carnivores) and (2) local knowledge of how to protect livestock from predation and whether it survived among pastoralists until the present. This study provides numeric information on carnivores, livestock and depredation, combined with oral information from summer farmers about livestock protection. We compare recent (since 1998) and historical (late nineteenth century) depredation rates in two Swedish counties. In Dalarna recent depredation rates are higher than historical rates while the opposite pattern is seen in Jamtland. Recent depredation rates in Dalarna are twice the recent rates in Jamtland, in contrast to the historical situation. Recent and historical depredation rates are of the same order. Summer farmers traditionally graze their livestock in forested areas where carnivores reside. Interviews show that traditional knowledge of how to protect livestock from carnivores was lost during the twentieth century, but recently new knowledge has developed leading to changes in summer farming practices. The carnivore-livestock situation today differs from the historical situation, not so much in levels of depredation, but mainly regarding the possibilities of farmers to face challenges associated with increasing carnivore populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG , 2017. Vol. 6, no 3, 63
Keyword [en]
carnivores, livestock depredation, wolves, bears, traditional knowledge, summer farms
National Category
Fish and Wildlife Management Physical Geography History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140916DOI: 10.3390/land6030063ISI: 000411997300019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-140916DiVA: diva2:1153761
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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