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Gaze-based assistive technology used in daily life by children with severe physical impairments - parents' experiences
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
2017 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe and explore parents' experiences when their children with severe physical impairments receive gaze-based assistive technology (gaze-based assistive technology (AT)) for use in daily life. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted twice, with one year in between, with parents of eight children with cerebral palsy that used gaze-based AT in their daily activities. To understand the parents' experiences, hermeneutical interpretations were used during data analysis. Results: The findings demonstrate that for parents, children's gaze-based AT usage meant that children demonstrated agency, provided them with opportunities to show personality and competencies, and gave children possibilities to develop. Overall, children's gaze-based AT provides hope for a better future for their children with severe physical impairments; a future in which the children can develop and gain influence in life. Conclusion: Gaze-based AT provides children with new opportunities to perform activities and take initiatives to communicate, giving parents hope about the children's future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 20, no 5, p. 301-308
Keywords [en]
Activities in daily life, cerebral palsy, eye tracking controlled system, self-help devices, parental hope, qualitative
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331954DOI: 10.1080/17518423.2016.1211769ISI: 000406527400008PubMedID: 27537982OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-331954DiVA, id: diva2:1151348
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2017-10-23Bibliographically approved

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