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Itsy Bitsy Spider...: Infants React with Increased Arousal to Spiders and Snakes
Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.; Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3046-0043
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 1710Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Attention biases have been reported for ancestral threats like spiders and snakes in infants, children, and adults. However, it is currently unclear whether these stimuli induce increased physiological arousal in infants. Here, 6-month-old infants were presented with pictures of spiders and flowers (Study 1, within-subjects), or snakes and fish (Study 1, within-subjects; Study 2, between-subjects). Infants'€™ pupillary responses linked to activation of the noradrenergic system were measured. Infants reacted with increased pupillary dilation indicating arousal to spiders and snakes compared with flowers and fish. Results support the notion of an evolved preparedness for developing fear of these ancestral threats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 8, article id 1710
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331847DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01710ISI: 000413144100001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-331847DiVA, id: diva2:1150374
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01710

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