Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Evaluating Cognitive Social Capital: The roles of trust and reciprocity in health research
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Social capital has become one of the most popular and controversial imports from the social sciences into public health. Although offering the potential for valuable insights into the social determinants of health, the vague and ambiguous definitions of what constitutes social resources has attracted significant criticisms. Providing a broad and theoretically inclusive approach, many scholars have categorized these resources into two domain-specific dimensions: structural (network-based) and cognitive social capital. Cognitive social capital is assessed through attitudinal measures such as perceived trust and reciprocity and is assumed to be indicative of the extent individuals engage in social exchange. Based on this assumption, researchers utilize measures of trust and reciprocity as either proxies of social capital when more precise measures are unavailable or as subjective components of the social capital construct. Yet, little research has empirically substantiated the validity of such practices. Through analyses of the 2008 Canadian General Social Survey, my findings indicate that a) there is little empirical support for the idea of a unified, cognitive dimension of social capital, b) measures of trust and reciprocity are inadequate proxies for social ties and c) trust and reciprocity are conceptually distinct from network-based social capital in their associations with health. While these concerns mostly translate to questions of definitions, there are important methodological and theoretical implications to consider. If health research on social capital instead utilized measures of actual social ties, the ambiguity clouding the concept could be cleared and the causes, correlates and consequences conceptualized with greater explanatory power and precision. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 49
Keywords [en]
social capital, health, trust, reciprocity
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331773OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-331773DiVA, id: diva2:1150103
Educational program
Master Programme in Social Sciences
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(617 kB)162 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 617 kBChecksum SHA-512
ac4aa87d0da73ddd751fc342d4c00d5a9352a85f110e36952c1d374e4df0731a024316c84b583a2d691c1a74519c24862dbdb786377b1b6f23c4e31e9515d135
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Sociology
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 162 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 336 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf