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Vaccination and allergy: EAACI position paper, practical aspects
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany.
Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
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2017 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immunization is highly effective in preventing infectious diseases and therefore an indispensable public health measure. Allergic patients deserve access to the same publicly recommended immunizations as nonallergic patients unless risks associated with vaccination outweigh the gains. Whereas the number of reported possible allergic reactions to vaccines is high, confirmed vaccine-triggered allergic reactions are rare. Anaphylaxis following vaccination is rare, affecting less than 1/100,000, but can occur in any patient. Some patient groups, notably those with a previous allergic reaction to a vaccine or its components, are at heightened risk of allergic reaction and require special precautions. Allergic reactions, however, may occur in patients without known risk factors and cannot be predicted by currently available tools. Unwarranted fear and uncertainty can result in incomplete vaccination coverage for children and adults with or without allergy. In addition to concerns about an allergic reaction to the vaccine itself, there is fear that routine childhood immunization may promote the development of allergic sensitization and disease. Thus, although there is no evidence that routine childhood immunization increases the risk of allergy development, such risks need to be discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017.
Keywords [en]
adjuvant, adverse event, allergy, anaphylaxis, vaccination
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141773DOI: 10.1111/pai.12762ISI: 000418437400003PubMedID: 28779496Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85031118328OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-141773DiVA, id: diva2:1150049
Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved

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