Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A Comparative Study of Segregation Patterns in Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden: Neighbourhood Concentration and Representation of Non-European Migrants
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we use geo-coded, individual level register data on four European countries to compute comparative measures of segregation that are independent of existing geographical sub- divisions. The focus is on non-European migrants, and using aggregates for egocentric neighbourhoods with different population counts, small-scale, medium-scale, and large-scale segregation patterns are assessed. At the smallest scale level, corresponding to neighbourhoods with 200 persons, patterns of over- and under-representation are strikingly similar. At larger scale levels, Belgium stands out as having relatively strong over- and under-representation. More than 55% of the Belgian population lives in large-scale neighbourhoods with moderate under- or over- representation of non-European migrants. In the other countries, the corresponding figures are between 30 % and 40%. Possible explanations for this pattern are differences in housing policies and refugee placement policies. Sweden has the largest and Denmark the smallest non-European migrant population, in relative terms. Thus, in both migrant-dense and native-born dense areas, Swedish neighbourhoods have a higher concentration, and Denmark a lower concentration of non- European migrants than the other countries. For large-scale, migrant-dense neighbourhoods, however, levels of concentration are similar in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Thus, if this pattern is linked to a high concentration of disadvantaged population groups, it shows that these countries are facing similar policy challenges with respect to neighbourhood contexts. Contexts that can have negative effects on outcomes such as employment, income and education. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 37
Series
ResSegr Working Paper ; 2017:1
Keywords [en]
segregation, comparison, non-European immigrants, concentration, representation, Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147975OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147975DiVA, id: diva2:1149553
Projects
Residential segregation in five European countries
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasAvailable from: 2017-10-16 Created: 2017-10-16 Last updated: 2018-02-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1153 kB)83 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1153 kBChecksum SHA-512
cee6c0d3875520d6463f789336da1df091279514ef5baa2b16d5d9cd1821c8271749560334972a74d4c4823e2f7736d0e8c2653a614a629f7ba67377e249be14
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, EvaMalmberg, Bo
By organisation
Department of Human Geography
Human Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 83 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 302 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf