Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Patient benefit of dog-assisted interventions in health care: a systematic review
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 17, 358Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Dogs are the most common companion animal, and therefore not surprisingly a popular choice for animal-assisted interventions. Dog-assisted interventions are increasingly used in healthcare. The aim of the review was to conduct a systematic literature review of quantitative studies on dog-assisted interventions in healthcare, with the intention of assessing the effects and cost-effectiveness of the interventions for different categories of patients. Methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature reporting results of studies in healthcare, nursing home or home care settings, was conducted. The inclusion criteria applied for this review were: quantitative studies, inclusion of at least 20 study subjects, existence of a control and performed in healthcare settings including nursing homes and home care. The electronic databases PubMed, AMED, CINAHL and Scopus were searched from their inception date through January 2017, for published articles from peer-reviewed journals with full text in English. Results: Eighteen studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and were judged to be of at least moderate quality, were included in the analysis. Three of them showed no effect. Fifteen showed at least one significant positive effect but in most studied outcome measures there was no significant treatment effect. Dog-assisted therapy had the greatest potential in treatment of psychiatric disorders among both young and adult patients. Dog-assisted activities had some positive effects on health, wellbeing, depression and quality of life for patients with severe cognitive disorders. Dog-assisted support had positive effects on stress and mood. Conclusions: The overall assessment of the included studies indicates minor to moderate effects of dog-assisted therapy in psychiatric conditions, as well as for dog-assisted activities in cognitive disorders and for dog-assisted support in different types of medical interventions. However, the majority of studied outcome measures showed no significant effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD , 2017. Vol. 17, 358
Keyword [en]
Animal-assisted therapy; Cost-benefit analysis; Dogs; Dog-assisted activity; Dog-assisted intervention; Dog-assisted support; Dog-assisted therapy; Outcome assessment (health care); Quality of life; Treatment outcome
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139564DOI: 10.1186/s12906-017-1844-7ISI: 000405065800001PubMedID: 28693538OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-139564DiVA: diva2:1130088
Note

Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2017-08-08 Created: 2017-08-08 Last updated: 2017-11-29

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(582 kB)29 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 582 kBChecksum SHA-512
eb1b3345cd00b3a8aad719f7900d4ea7fa7d4c78c94e22d64eb808744017eaee2407a9637571943a40de06b42623dfa2a4cd8be6f9a9fc50496a1836cfde1f02
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lundqvist, MartinaCarlsson, PerSjödahl, RuneTheodorsson, ElvarLevin, Lars-Åke
By organisation
Division of Health Care AnalysisFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDivision of Surgery, Orthopedics and OncologyDepartment of Surgery in LinköpingDivision of Microbiology and Molecular MedicineDepartment of Clinical Chemistry
In the same journal
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 29 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 107 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf