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Heritage on the move: Cross-cultural heritage as a response to globalisation, mobilities and multiple migrations
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3353-8969
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 23, no 10, 913-927 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Globalisation is creating new perceptions of social and cultural spaces as well as complex and diverse pictures of migration flows. This leads to changes in expressions of culture, identity, and belonging and thus the role of heritage today. I argue that common or dominant notions of heritage cannot accommodate these new cultural identities-in-flux created by and acting in a transplanetary networked and culturally deterritorialized world. To support my arguments, I will introduce ‘Third Culture Kids’ or ‘global nomads’, defined as a particular type of migrant community whose cultural identities are characterised high patterns of global mobility during childhood. My research focus on the uses and meaning of cultural heritage among this onward migrant community, and it reveals that these global nomads both use common forms of heritage as a cultural capital to crisscross cultures, and designate places of mobility, like airports, to recall collective memories as people on the move. These results pose additional questions to the traditional use of heritage, and suggest others visions of heritage today, as people’s cultural identities turn to be now more characterised by mobility, cultural flux, and belonging to horizontal networks. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017. Vol. 23, no 10, 913-927 p.
Keyword [en]
Heritage communities, Faro Convention, deterritorialization, Third Culture Kid, global nomads
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology; Humanities, Cultural Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67189DOI: 10.1080/13527258.2017.1347890ISI: 000410780900001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67189DiVA: diva2:1130055
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 658760
Available from: 2017-08-08 Created: 2017-08-08 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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