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A lifebuoy that supports in deep water: A qualitative case study investigating how an external actor can support an organisation in crisis
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Problem 

Crisis management has never been as important as it is today. Considering that criticism is being spread in a fast pace through social media, the reputation of an organisation can quickly be damaged. Several organisations however lack internal knowledge about crisis management. The majority of the previous research about crisis management has been conducted from the organisations’ perspective. There is however relatively little research done from an external actor’s role in supporting an organisation in crisis.

Purpose 

This study aims to contribute in the crisis management and communication field by investigating how an external actor can support an organisation in crisis.

Method 

The study was conducted through a qualitative single case study of crisis management support provided to firms by one external actor, a PR-agency. Primary data for the case was collected from six semi-structured interviews.

Conclusion 

External actors are a suitable helping hand in crises because they possess experience and knowledge in media and crisis communication and can view the situation objectively. Crisis consultants support their clients by providing a response strategy that is built on being honest and open. Proactive and post work are not prioritised by clients but are highly important for crisis preparedness and building a strong reputation. Social media is a standard part of today’s crisis communication but is also a demanding channel that creates incentives for hiring external support. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 59
Keywords [en]
Crisis management, Crisis communication, Crisis Consultancy, PR-agency, Reputation, Social Media, External support, Social-Mediated Crisis Communication Model (SMCC), Situational Crisis Communication Theory (SCCT)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324823OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-324823DiVA, id: diva2:1111719
Educational program
Master Programme in Business and Management
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-19 Last updated: 2017-06-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf