Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Climate Crimes: Climate change and deforestation: a case-study of state-corporate crime in Peru
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics, Institute of Latin American Studies.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

During the last decades, climate change studies have been focusing more intensely on its anthopocenic essence, as the consequence of production and consumption patterns that require the intensive exploitation of the environment. In line with this school of thought, and new generations of studies on environmental crime, this work aims to present the environmentally and climate-related issues arising from land degradation in the Peruvian Amazon; focusing on those casual mechanisms developed from the collusion between Peruvian-economic policies and new private actors such as transnational corporations (TNCs). Relying on the assumption that: the processes moving the issue of climate change overcome the global space, and can be observed from regional, national or local point of view; this work's purpose is to analyze how a single country as Peru, currently considered of low ecological footprint, could, by means of the definition of national laws (environmentally and economic-related) burden climate change. The analysis focuses on a single case-study identified with the territory within the Northern Ucayali and Southern Loreto regions in Peru, and builds on the theory of state-corporate crime developed in the 1990s by Ronald C. Kramer and Raymond J. Michalowski to define the role of state-corporate relationships in the production of social harms. To show how this relationship is today shaping the globally spread issue of climate change, the analysis of the palm oil industry in Ucayali is presented as main example of a broader phenomenon of transgression and partnership between private and public spheres in Peru. In this optic, the purpose is to give further contributions to the studies of climate change as state-corporate crime, focusing on the analysis of those territory, as the Amazon, whose preservation has been identified as mayor tool against global warming and which is instead harmed by the relation between private and governments interests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 63 p.
Keyword [en]
Peru, Amazon, climate change, environmental crime, state-corporate crime, palm oil industry, indigenous peoples
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-144124OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-144124DiVA: diva2:1108196
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2017-06-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(932 kB)27 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 932 kBChecksum SHA-512
a52111fbd3cba64ae36213f3d8ebad767cc775bec5586598d03dd986854e13162e43271f7e3fa2e6ddc40d0c2a2b6b4fcae9b38ea11499603e33aa4a4378ef44
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Institute of Latin American Studies
Cultural Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 27 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 558 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf