Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Morphological variability in second language learners: An examination of electrophysiological and production data
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
(English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

We examined potential sources of morphological variability in adult L1‑English L2‑Spanish learners, with a focus on L1‑L2 similarity, morphological markedness, and knowledge type (receptive vs. expressive). Experiment 1 uses event‑related potentials to examine noun‑adjective number (present in L1) and gender agreement (absent in L1) in online sentence comprehension (receptive knowledge). For each feature, markedness was manipulated, such that half of the critical noun‑adjective combinations were feminine (marked) and the other half, masculine; half were used in the plural (marked) and the other half in the singular. With this set‑up, we examined learners’ potential overreliance on unmarked forms or “defaults” (singular/masculine). Experiment 2 examines similar dependencies in spoken sentence production (expressive knowledge). Results showed that learners (n=22) performed better with number than gender overall, but their brain responses to both features were qualitatively native‑like (i.e., P600), even though gender was probed with nouns that do not provide strong distributional cues to gender. In addition, variability with gender agreement was better accounted for by lexical (as opposed to syntactic) aspects. Learners showed no advantage for comprehension over production. They also showed no systematic evidence of reliance on morphological defaults, although their online processing was sensitive to markedness in a native‑like manner. Overall, these results suggest that there is facilitation for properties of the L2 that exist in the L1 and that markedness impacts L2 processing, but in a native‑like manner. These results also speak against proposals arguing that adult L2ers have deficits at the level of the morphology or the syntax.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA).
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-141962DOI: 10.1037/xlm0000394OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-141962DiVA: diva2:1089949
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2017-04-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1463 kB)42 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1463 kBChecksum SHA-512
9e199a38f81d320cf56c4da455fafc00cf057a5045a506008ed7027d803b29634b574e38883132054ca034cadc24e312b58b9340cbc49e609be731dd994f3fee
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Alemán Bañón, José
By organisation
Centre for Research on Bilingualism
In the same journal
Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition
General Language Studies and Linguistics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 42 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 133 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf