Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Using Crowdsourced Online Experiments to Study Context-dependency of Behavior
Department of Sociology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.
Department of Sociology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.
Department of Sociology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.
2016 (English)In: Social Science Research, ISSN 0049-089X, E-ISSN 1096-0317, Vol. 59, p. 68-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We use Mechanical Turk's diverse participant pool to conduct online bargaining games in India and the US. First, we assess internal validity of crowdsourced experimentation through variation of stakes ($0, $1, $4, and $10) in the Ultimatum and Dictator Game. For cross-country equivalence we adjust the stakes following differences in purchasing power. Our marginal totals correspond closely to laboratory findings. Monetary incentives induce more selfish behavior but, in line with most laboratory findings, the particular size of a positive stake appears irrelevant. Second, by transporting a homogeneous decision situation into various living conditions crowdsourced experimentation permits identification of context effects on elicited behavior. We explore context-dependency using session-level variation in participants' geographical location, regional affluence, and local social capital. Across “virtual pools” behavior varies in the range of stake effects. We argue that quasi-experimental variation of the characteristics people bring to the experimental situation is the key potential of crowdsourced online designs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 59, p. 68-82
Keywords [en]
Context effects; Cross-country equivalence; Dictator game; Mechanical Turk; Raising the stakes; Ultimatum game
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136539DOI: 10.1016/j.ssresearch.2016.04.014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84964579704OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-136539DiVA, id: diva2:1089302
Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(420 kB)60 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 420 kBChecksum SHA-512
453ee7ebef8b162f7e8c95fa3d0316ca3ce7faf8b877569d618b074788c55be9f76b11a7dca8c9662420d990b9e76675f1b7059d8819e420730552d427fc8c84
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Keuschnigg, Marc
In the same journal
Social Science Research
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 60 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 77 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf