Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Short-term herbivory has long-term consequences in warmed and ambient high Arctic tundra
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics. Eawag Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Aquat Ecol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland..
Oregon State Univ, Dept Forest Ecosyst & Soc, Cascades Campus, Bend, OR 97701 USA..
Qatar Univ, Coll Arts & Sci, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Doha, Qatar..
UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Biosci Fisheries & Econ, Dept Arctic & Marine Biol, N-9037 Tromso, Norway..
2017 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 025001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is occurring across the world, with effects varying by ecosystem and region but already occurring quickly in high-latitude and high-altitude regions. Biotic interactions are important in determining ecosystem response to such changes, but few studies have been long-term in nature, especially in the High Arctic. Mesic tundra plots on Svalbard, Norway, were subjected to grazing at two different intensities by captive Barnacle geese from 2003-2005, in a factorial design with warming by Open Top Chambers. Warming manipulations were continued through 2014, when we measured vegetation structure and composition as well as growth and reproduction of three dominant species in the mesic meadow. Significantly more dead vascular plant material was found in warmed compared to ambient plots, regardless of grazing history, but in contrast to many short-term experiments no difference in the amount of living material was found. This has strong implications for nutrient and carbon cycling and could feed back into community productivity. Dominant species showed increased flowering in warmed plots, especially in those plots where grazing had been applied. However, this added sexual reproduction did not translate to substantial shifts in vegetative cover. Forbs and rushes increased slightly in warmed plots regardless of grazing, while the dominant shrub, Salix polaris, generally declined with effects dependent on grazing, and the evergreen shrub Dryas octopetala declined with previous intensive grazing. There were no treatment effects on community diversity or evenness. Thus despite no changes in total live abundance, a typical short-term response to environmental conditions, we found pronounced changes in dead biomass indicating that tundra ecosystem processes respond to medium-to long-term changes in conditions caused by 12 seasons of summer warming. We suggest that while high arctic tundra plant communities are fairly resistant to current levels of climate warming, underlying ecosystem processes are beginning to change. In addition, even short bouts of intense herbivory can have long-term consequences for some species in these communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP PUBLISHING LTD , 2017. Vol. 12, no 2, article id 025001
Keywords [en]
Alopecurus magellanicus, Bistorta vivipara, biodiversity, climate change, community structure, open-top chambers, Salix polaris
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319107DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa579dISI: 000395418600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-319107DiVA, id: diva2:1086570
Available from: 2017-04-03 Created: 2017-04-03 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1116 kB)45 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1116 kBChecksum SHA-512
e639e1aa9ca652389871bd51d3d17e26d52612e9a9db9114c3d51ccdc4ee66440577e6bb25a2e0ec46d079a746846b016ce6a04fedee7f44541f10e0977153f9
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text
By organisation
Department of Ecology and Genetics
In the same journal
Environmental Research Letters
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 45 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 260 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf