Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Intragenerational social mobility and functional somatic symptoms in a northern Swedish context: analyses of diagonal reference models
Umea Univ, Unit Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
Umea Univ, Unit Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
Umea Univ, Unit Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
2017 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 16, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research indicate that social class mobility could be potentially important for health, but whether this is due to the movement itself or a result of people having been integrated in different class contexts is, to date, difficult to infer. In addition, although several theories suggest that transitions between classes in the social hierarchy can be stressful experiences, few studies have empirically examined whether such movements may have health effects, over and above the implications of "being" in these classes. In an attempt to investigate whether intragenerational social mobility is associated with functional somatic symptoms in mid-adulthood, the current study tests three partially contrasting theories. Method: The dissociative theory suggests that mobility in general and upward mobility in particular may be linked to psychological distress, while the falling from grace theory indicates that downward mobility is especially stressful. In contrast, the acculturation theory holds that the health implications of social mobility is not due to the movement itself but attributed to the class contexts in which people find themselves. Diagonal Reference Models were used on a sample of 924 individuals who in 1981 graduated from 9th grade in the municipality of Lulea, Sweden. Social mobility was operationalized as change in occupational class between age 30 and 42 (measured in 1995 and 2007). The health outcome was functional somatic symptoms at age 42, defined as a clustering self-reported physical symptoms, palpitation and sleeping difficulties during the last 12 months. Results: Overall mobility was not associated with higher levels of functional somatic symptoms compared to being immobile (p = 0.653). After controlling for prior and current class, sex, parental social position, general health, civil status, education and unemployment, the association between downward mobility was borderline significant (p = 0.055) while upward mobility was associated with lower levels of functional somatic symptoms (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The current study did not find unanimous support for any of the theories. Nevertheless, it sheds light on the possibility that upward mobility may be beneficial to reduce stress-related health problems in mid-life over and above the exposure to prior and current class, while downward mobility can be of less importance for middle-age health complaints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 16, article id 1
Keyword [en]
Sweden, Social mobility, Intragenerational, Social class, Life course, Diagonal reference model, Self-reported symptoms
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315060DOI: 10.1186/s12939-016-0499-1ISI: 000391407500001PubMedID: 28057005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-315060DiVA, id: diva2:1079512
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(417 kB)108 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 417 kBChecksum SHA-512
ddab64a51a24bdb57c0d223bbbcc477a10ba43b057b904960cb47719e0e60ee673e02be0cb8e04da31cf77f3080726adf24a4add324dfec66ea7b338ad2e86a1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hammarström, Anne
By organisation
Public Health
In the same journal
International Journal for Equity in Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 108 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 415 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf