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Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts
Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. (The Ethics of Migration)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2867-1212
2017 (English)In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, 1-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue - while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first step of her defence of emigration restrictions, Brock provides three reasons why skilled workers themselves would hold responsibilities to assist with respect to vital needs of their compatriots. These are fair reciprocity, duty to support vital institutions, and attending to the unintended harmful consequences of one's actions. While the first two are explained and also largely discussed in the literature, the third requires an explication on how and on which basis skilled workers would have a responsibility as such. In this article, I offer a vulnerability approach with its dependency aspect that may account for why the health workers in underserved contexts would have a responsibility to attend to the unintended side effects of their actions that may lead to a vital risk of harm for the population. I discuss HIV/AIDS care in Zimbabwe as a case in point in order to show that local health workers may have responsibilities to assist the population who are vulnerable to their mobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. 1-16 p.
Keyword [en]
medical brain drain, ethics, vulnerability, Zimbabwe, HIV/AIDS, health workers
National Category
Ethics Philosophy Medical Ethics International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134570DOI: 10.1007/s10728-017-0342-xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-134570DiVA: diva2:1074937
Funder
Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation, FO2013-0484
Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29

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Yuksekdag, Yusuf
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