Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Time Does Not Help Orangutans Pongo abelii Solve Physical Problems
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many questions in animal intelligence and cognition research are challenging. One challenge is to identify mechanisms underlying reasoning in experiments. Here, we provide a way to design such tests in non-human animals. We know from research in skill acquisition in humans that reasoning and thinking can take time because some problems are processed in multiple steps before a solution is reached (e.g., during mental arithmetics). If animals are able to learn through similar processes their decision making can be time consuming, and most importantly improve if more time to process information is allowed. We tested if performance of two Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) increased in a two-choice experiment when they were allowed extra time before making their decisions, compared to when they were forced to decide immediately. We found that the performance of the orangutans did not depend on the time they were allowed to process the information before making their decisions. This methodology provides a potential avenue for empirical tests of mechanisms underlying reasoning in non-human animals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 8, article id 161
Keyword [en]
animal cognition, methodology, intelligence, orangutans, reasoning, thinking, associative learning
National Category
Behavioral Sciences Biology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Ethology; Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-139539DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00161ISI: 000393475700001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-139539DiVA: diva2:1072499
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0005
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2017-02-08 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1074 kB)46 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1074 kBChecksum SHA-512
95e497685e5fd01ef4d6c9254fd02bc4e11e8e007000c0a4d6772db90b0779489561b0f94e91637cfbab541df8780bd452de594363579960b859e807f5feac88
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lind, JohanEnquist, Magnus
By organisation
Centre for the Study of Cultural EvolutionDepartment of Zoology
In the same journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Behavioral Sciences BiologyPsychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 46 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 170 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf