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The Forest of Our Lives: In and Out of Political Ecology
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. (miljöantropologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2839-4297
2016 (English)In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 380-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, I seek to bring together a number of environmental histories to think about the place of forest in our lives. It is partly autobiographical in the sense that it concerns forest issues that 1, for various reasons, have been entangled with recently. These are the making of carbon (REDD+) forests in Northeast India, preservation of the urban forests and planting of indigenous trees in Karura forests in Nairobi, Kenya, and the transformation of Swedish forests into vast industrial plantations. I come to these issues with little knowledge about the forest ecology or the flora and fauna, as such, but rather as a scholar with earlier experience of analysis of the social and political dynamics involved in conflicts over forests, that is, how differently powered actors seek to appropriate, stake claims to or control the forest. Hence, my point of departure and analytical framework is largely that of political ecology. In a conversation about the work of the anthropologist Brian Morris, I will point to the thinness of such an approach and open up aspects that are critical to Morris' way of engaging with the interactions of people, plants, insects, and animals. This, I will argue, is a truly grounded environmental anthropology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bangalore: ARTREE , 2016. Vol. 14, no 4, p. 380-390
Keyword [en]
Brian Morris, forest conservation, political ecology, indigenous environmental knowledge, indigenous trees, invasive species, industrial forest management, India, Kenya, Sweden
National Category
Social Anthropology
Research subject
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138546DOI: 10.4103/0972-4923.197611ISI: 000392749800008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138546DiVA, id: diva2:1067626
Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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