Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Diatom distribution in the lower Save river, Mozambique: Taxonomy, salinity gradient and taphonomy
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

In this study diatom distribution within the lower Save River, Mozambique, has been identified from surface sediments, surface water, mangrove cortex and buried sediments. Sandy units, bracketing a geographically extensive clay layer, have been dated with optical stimulated luminescence (OSL). Diatom analysis has been used to interpret the spatial salinity gradient and to discuss taphonomic processes within the delta. Previously, one study has been performed in the investigated area and it is of great importance to continue to identify diatom distributions since siliceous microfossils are widely used for paleoenvironmental research. Two diatom taxa, which were not possible to classify to species level have been identified; Cyclotella sp. and Diploneis sp. It is suggested that these represent species not earlier described; however they are assigned a brackish water affinity. Diatom analysis from surface water, surface sediments and mangrove cortex indicate a transition from ocean water to a dominance of freshwater taxa c. 10 km upstream the delta front. Further, ratios between marine/brackish taxa for samples from surface water and surface sediments do not correspond. It is therefore suggested that diatoms in surface sediments underestimate prevailing salinity conditions in water. In the investigated area extensive taphonomic processes seem to have large impact on diatom frustules in sediments and may bias interpretations. Therefore it is recommended to carefully investigate geology, geomorphology and vegetation before diatom analysis is applied in studies of delta paleoenvironments. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , p. 94
Keywords [en]
Diatoms, Quaternary geology, micropaleontology, taphonomy, taxonomy, siliceous microfossils
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138414OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138414DiVA, id: diva2:1067177
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(7915 kB)154 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 7915 kBChecksum SHA-512
6b37e3fdc95ad23c00145f23bec3eec3418e72937fbaf2d0b050337a7ffd67432d931efe4785190b8c39e320d699db5dc6c2930d72141371e8e9a13df3ccb887
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Physical Geography
Climate Research

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 154 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 360 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf