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Is family structure associated with the psychological behavior of young people?: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire in a population sample
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Differences in family structure have been linked to several mental health outcomes, where children living in a nuclear family setting are best-off, while children in joint physical custody are second best followed by those living mostly and only with one parent. One of the biggest changes in recent years is that joint physical custody is growing more common. The dependent variables in this thesis were three dimensions of mental health from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Data from 6th and 9th graders in the entire Sweden 2009 was used. Regression modelling showed differences in mental health between the family structures throughout, although children in  joint physical custody was not significantly different from those in nuclear families (reference category) in half of the models. Children living mostly with one parent reported the third worst levels of problematic behaviour and prevalence of low prosocial behaviour while those living with just one parent were worst off. Stratifying by gender did reveal small coefficient differences and so did controls for birth region. This thesis, although in a line of other publications based on this study can help shape future guidelines for e.g. social workers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keywords [en]
SDQ, family structure, Grodan, joint custody, externalizing, internalizing, prosocial behaviour
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138293OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138293DiVA, id: diva2:1066668
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Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2017-01-19Bibliographically approved

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Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
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