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The palaeopathology of wild mammals in archaeology = Vadon élő emlősállatok betegségei a régészetben
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
2016 (English)In: Archeometriai Műhely, ISSN 1786-271X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Domestication is known to have increased animal morbidity. Wild animals, however, should not be looked upon romantically like Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “noble sauvage”, untainted by civilisation. Rare pathological lesions found on the bones of wild animals in archaeozoological assemblages, they offer valuable information both from a zoological and a archaeological point of view. In addition to discussing problems of sampling, this paper is a review of major factors such as taphonomy, environment, and heritability that determine the manifestation of disease in wild animals in archaeological assemblages. A simple classification, specifically developed for wild animals, is presented that helps better understand these conditions. Numerous examples from both the author’s own work and the broad base of international literature (especially on Europe and the Southwest Asia) are cited to help illustrate how disease is manifested on the bones of wild animals recovered from a variety of archaeological periods. The results of this paper show that although domestication undoubtedly brought about an increase in animal morbidity, depending on the chances of survival of a game species and the functional importance of the body part affected, a variety of pathological lesions regularly occur on the remains of wild animals as well.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Budapest: Hungarian National Museum , 2016. Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-30
Keywords [en]
archaeozoology, palaeopathology, wild mammals, taphonomy
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Osteoarchaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138284OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-138284DiVA, id: diva2:1066640
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2017-01-31Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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