Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Turn at the roundabout:A practical assessment of spatialrepresentations in two different GPS interfacesfrom a pedestrian’s perspective
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Satellite Positioning.
2007 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The role played by landmarks and 3D visualisations in navigation and wayfinding wasinvestigated from a pedestrian’s perspective. Two GPS units, a Garmin GPSMap 76CSand an hp iPAQ running Navigon MobileNavigator (Navigator) were assessed todetermine the usability of their interfaces. During the evaluation, particular attention waspaid to the use of landmarks and 3D representations in the maps displayed and theroutes directed to the user. Both systems used some landmarks in their display of theroute. The role that these landmarks played in describing and assisting in navigation toa pedestrian, and thus the value and benefits of their inclusion, was found to vary.The Garmin interface, a dedicated GPS unit, displayed landmarks when the maps wereviewed at a scale greater than 1:20 000. The landmarks displayed included restaurants,fast food outlets and service stations. Whilst represented on maps, these landmarkswere not referred to in the given wayfinding direction. The other tested interface,Navigator, was a PDA based interface, with the hardware capable of other tasksunrelated to GPS navigation. The Navigator interface also displayed landmarks,including fast food outlets, restaurants and car dealerships. The only landmarks to beexplicitly referred to in either interface were the roundabouts in the Navigator interface,where any instructions requiring a turn at a roundabout would explicitly mention that theturn was to be made at the roundabout. Both systems would only refer to buildingsdisplayed if one of those buildings displayed was the user’s destination. Thus, the otherbuilding landmarks represented in the maps served only as a form of reassurance forthe user, and using these to assist in navigation relied upon interpretation from the user.The landmarks displayed were found to be most useful when easily identified on thestreet and were in prominent positions. A clear representation on screen, which did notrely upon labelling the landmarks, was found to be of significant benefit. This both madean instantly recognisable representation and kept the interface’s display free fromclutter. Systems could be improved by future development to display landmarks at morecritical points along a particular route, and explicitly referring to these in the givendirections.Another distinct limitation in effectiveness was identified in the use of 3-dimensionalrepresentations, with neither system reflecting the 3-dimensional space well. Bothinterfaces represented their 3-dimensional views without any building appearancedetails. Excluding landmarks is likely to be a cost based decision made by the softwaredevelopers. There would be significant expense involved in creating and updating eachbuilding along a particular route. However, excluding building detail made the spacesurrounding the user appear open and empty in the 3D viewing modes. This poorlyrepresented the area in an urban setting, where buildings play a large role in definingspace. Improving this representation, to reflect a more closed in and confined space,was also identified as an opportunity for future development for both tested interfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
Series
TRITA-GIT EX ; 07-01
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-199720OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-199720DiVA, id: diva2:1065417
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2017-01-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2025 kB)17 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2025 kBChecksum SHA-512
0fa943496f321ca20db5bbb20a4ee2fbb304ed5d7f432d6ac33f268e3b812c59e5a2669ebbc6f41285d0036b254f66860847106d46aadb20daff6bab1d48bd9d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Geodesy and Satellite Positioning
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 17 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf