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Amy2B copy number variation reveals starch diet adaptations in ancient European dogs
Ecole Normale Super Lyon, PALGENE, French Natl Platform Paleogenet, CNRS ENS Lyon, 46 Allee Italie, F-69364 Lyon 07, France.;Univ Grenoble Alpes, Lab Ecol Alpine LECA, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
CNRS MNHN SUs UMR 7209, Archeozool Archeobot Soc Prat & Environm, 55 Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France..
Ecole Normale Super Lyon, PALGENE, French Natl Platform Paleogenet, CNRS ENS Lyon, 46 Allee Italie, F-69364 Lyon 07, France.;Univ Grenoble Alpes, Lab Ecol Alpine LECA, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
Univ Rennes 1, CNRS UMR6290, Inst Genet & Dev Rennes, F-35000 Rennes, France..
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2016 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 3, no 11, article id 160449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extant dog and wolf DNA indicates that dog domestication was accompanied by the selection of a series of duplications on the Amy2B gene coding for pancreatic amylase. In this study, we used a palaeogenetic approach to investigate the timing and expansion of the Amy2B gene in the ancient dog populations of Western and Eastern Europe and Southwest Asia. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to estimate the copy numbers of this gene for 13 ancient dog samples, dated to between 15 000 and 4000 years before present (cal. BP). This evidenced an increase of Amy2B copies in ancient dogs from as early as the 7th millennium cal. BP in Southeastern Europe. We found that the gene expansion was not fixed across all dogs within this early farming context, with ancient dogs bearing between 2 and 20 diploid copies of the gene. The results also suggested that selection for the increased Amy2B copy number started 7000 years cal. BP, at the latest. This expansion reflects a local adaptation that allowed dogs to thrive on a starch rich diet, especially within early farming societies, and suggests a biocultural coevolution of dog genes and human culture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 3, no 11, article id 160449
Keywords [en]
domestication, palaeogenomics, amylase, dog, Neolithic
National Category
Zoology Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312101DOI: 10.1098/rsos.160449ISI: 000389244400020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-312101DiVA, id: diva2:1064549
Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-04 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Axelsson, ErikArendt, Maja Louise
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Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLabDepartment of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology
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