Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Measuring Corruption: Whose Perceptions Should We Rely On?
Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2016 (English)In: Stjornmal og Stjornsysla / The Icelandic Review of Politics & Administration, ISSN 1670-6803, E-ISSN 1670-679X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 215-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The extent of corruption in Iceland is highly contested. International corruption measures indicate a relatively small amount of corruption, while domestic public opinion suggest a serious corruption problem. Thus, uncertainty prevails about the actual extent of corruption and whose perceptions to rely on. This problem is relevant for corruption research in general. Perceptions are increasingly used as proxies for the actual levels of corruption in comparative research. But we still do not know enough about the accuracy of these proxies or the criteria they must meet in order to give dependable results. In fact, radical differences exist concerning evaluations of perceptions between those who believe in unbiased learning and those believing perceptual bias to be widespread. The purpose of this article is, therefore, to attempt to gauge which factors may influence how perceptions of corruption are shaped and why differences in corruption perceptions between different groups may be so pronounced. We present findings from original survey data from three parallel surveys – among the ‘public’, experts, and ‘municipal practitioners’ – conducted in Iceland in 2014. Expectations based on the perceptual bias approach are tested, indicating that perceptions may be affected by (1) information factors, (2) direct experience of corruption and (3) emotive factors. The validity of perception measures should be considered with this in mind. Domestic experts are likely to be well informed and avoid perceptual bias to a greater extent than other groups. Our examination of the Icelandic case suggests that the Corruption Perception Index (CPI) tends to underestimate corruption problems in ‘mature welfare states’, such as Iceland, whilst the general public tends to overestimate it. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 12, no 2, p. 215-235
Keyword [en]
Corruption
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133362DOI: 10.13177/irpa.a.2016.12.2.2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-133362DiVA, id: diva2:1059306
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2017-11-29

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(458 kB)99 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 458 kBChecksum SHA-512
2f6deda35131a7d1a95ef24bdb892dd56d51bfbe81f492b65eb50cf1d9d8f480e09dfb7292e9984ee0f8fe11ae6ea98d1371e6c30e5c89a17448c784696496ac
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Erlingsson, Gissur Ó
By organisation
Centre for Municipality Studies – CKSFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Stjornmal og Stjornsysla / The Icelandic Review of Politics & Administration
Political Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 99 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 135 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf