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Housing restitution and privatization: Both catalysts and obstacles to the formation of private rental housing in the Czech Republic and Estonia
Institute of Sociology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
University of Tartu, Estonia.
Institute of Sociology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
2012 (English)In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The return of property expropriated during the communist period to previous owners or to their descendants (property restitution) led to the quick emergence of a private rental sector in those post-communist countries that applied a physical form of property restitution soon after 1990. The Czech Republic and Estonia are examples of such countries. Within just a few years, as a result of property restitution, a private rental sector grew out of almost non-existence to become a significant part of the countries’ total housing stock. However, the character of this sector remained different from the private rental sector found in countries with advanced economies – especially owing to specific rent regulation, tenant protection and, albeit indirectly, public housing privatisation. This article analyses and compares the genesis of private rental tenure in the Czech Republic and Estonia. Its main goal is to demonstrate how state regulations and interventions have influenced tenure choice, the formation of social norms, and thus the permanent perception of private renting. In both transition countries private renting gradually acquired the character of a transitional and residual form of housing. State interventions early on in the transition were probably the most significant factors behind the fact that private renting did not establish itself as a real tenure alternative to owner-occupied housing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-158
Keywords [en]
Czech Republic, Estonia, housing tenure, housing system, private renting
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310943DOI: 10.1080/14616718.2012.681574OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-310943DiVA, id: diva2:1058244
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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