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Occlusive bandaging of wounds with decreased circulation promotes growth of anaerobic bacteria and necrosis: case report
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. (The Institute for Protein Environmental Affinity Surveys (PEAS Institut) and Department of Infectious Diseases, Linköping University, Linköping)
2016 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 9, no 394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Topical occlusive/semi-occlusive dressings that induce a damp and trapped environment are widely used in wound treatment. Subjecting the wound with impaired circulation to such trapped/air-free environment potentiates the growth of anaerobic bacteria and risk for serious infection. Case presentation: We present a case of previously healthy Swedish male that had a muscle contusion after heavy trauma that induced impaired circulation. The application of an occlusive bandage to the post-traumatic wound on the patient resulted in a poly-microbial anaerobic infection and necrosis. These complications were treated successfully with antibiotics and open dressing of the wound. Conclusion: The pathophysiology of difficult- to- treat ulcers should be reviewed by the physician and occlusive dressing should be avoided when treating wounds with impaired circulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016. Vol. 9, no 394
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133306DOI: 10.1186/s13104-016-2205-1OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-133306DiVA, id: diva2:1057632
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29

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Nayeri, Fariba
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