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Boreal earliest Triassic biotas elucidate globally depauperate hard substrate communities after the end-Permian mass extinction
Univ Silesia, Fac Earth Sci, Bedzinska 60, PL-41200 Sosnowiec, Poland.;KNOW Leading Natl Res Ctr, Ctr Polar Studies, Sosnowiec, Poland..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 36345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The end-Permian mass extinction constituted the most devastating biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic. Its aftermath was characterized by harsh marine conditions incorporating volcanically induced oceanic warming, widespread anoxia and acidification. Bio-productivity accordingly experienced marked fluctuations. In particular, low palaeolatitude hard substrate communities from shallow seas fringing Western Pangaea and the Tethyan Realm were extremely impoverished, being dominated by monogeneric colonies of filter-feeding microconchid tubeworms. Here we present the first equivalent field data for Boreal hard substrate assemblages from the earliest Triassic (Induan) of East Greenland. This region bordered a discrete bio-realm situated at mid-high palaeolatitude (> 30 degrees N). Nevertheless, hard substrate biotas were compositionally identical to those from elsewhere, with microconchids encrusting Claraia bivalves and algal buildups on the sea floor. Biostratigraphical correlation further shows that Boreal microconchids underwent progressive tube modification and unique taxic diversification concordant with changing habitats over time. We interpret this as a post-extinction recovery and adaptive radiation sequence that mirrored coeval subequatorial faunas, and thus confirms hard substrate ecosystem depletion as a hallmark of the earliest Triassic interval globally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 6, article id 36345
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Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309809DOI: 10.1038/srep36345ISI: 000387314500001PubMedID: 27821855OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-309809DiVA, id: diva2:1056444
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Swedish Polar Research SecretariatAvailable from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-07 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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