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Failure to Genotype: A Cautionary Note on an Elusive loxP Sequence
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3117-5367
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, e0165012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here we report on a technical difficulty we encountered while optimizing genotyping strategies to identify mice derived from Exoc3l2(tm1a( KOMP)Wtsi) embryonic stem cells obtained from the Knockout Mouse Project Repository. The Exoc3l2(tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi) construct encodes a "knockout-first" design with loxP sites that confer conditional potential (KO1st). We designed primers that targeted wild-type sequences flanking the most downstream element of the construct, an 80 base pair synthetic loxP region, which BLAST alignment analysis reveals is an element common to over 10,000 conditional gene-targeting mouse models. As PCR products amplified from KO1st and wild-type templates would have different lengths (and different mobility in an agarose gel) this strategy was designed to determine the zygosity of individual mice from a single PCR. In parallel we performed PCR with a primer specifically targeting the synthetic loxP sequence. Unexpectedly, while the latter strategy detected the synthetic loxP region and correctly genotyped KO1st chimeric mice, the same individuals were genotyped as wild-type when using the primers that flanked the synthetic loxP region. We discuss the possibility that secondary DNA structures, formed due to the palindromic nature of the synthetic loxP region, may have caused the KO1st template to elude the PCR when using primers that flanked this region. This brief report aims to raise awareness regarding this potential source of false-negative genotype results, particularly for those who are devising genotyping strategies for similarly engineered animal models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 11, no 10, e0165012
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308918DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165012ISI: 000386205400044PubMedID: 27768725OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-308918DiVA: diva2:1051178
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2014/820Swedish Research Council, 2010-3968NIH (National Institute of Health), U01HG004085
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2016-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Kreuger, JohanO'Callaghan, Paul
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