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An analysis of Apollo lunar soil samples 12070,889, 12030,187, and 12070,891: Basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site and implications for classification of small-sized lunar samples
Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology. (Early Planetary Evolution)
University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom.
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2016 (English)In: Meteoritics and Planetary Science, ISSN 1086-9379, E-ISSN 1945-5100, Vol. 51, 1654-1677 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lunar mare basalts provide insights into the compositional diversity of the Moon's interior. Basalt fragments from the lunar regolith can potentially sample lava flows from regions of the Moon not previously visited, thus, increasing our understanding of lunar geological evolution. As part of a study of basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site, detailed petrological and geochemical data are provided here for 13 basaltic chips. In addition to bulk chemistry, we have analyzed the major, minor, and trace element chemistry of mineral phases which highlight differences between basalt groups. Where samples contain olivine, the equilibrium parent melt magnesium number (Mg#; atomic Mg/[Mg + Fe]) can be calculated to estimate parent melt composition. Ilmenite and plagioclase chemistry can also determine differences between basalt groups. We conclude that samples of approximately 1–2 mm in size can be categorized provided that appropriate mineral phases (olivine, plagioclase, and ilmenite) are present. Where samples are fine-grained (grain size <0.3 mm), a “paired samples t-test” can provide a statistical comparison between a particular sample and known lunar basalts. Of the fragments analyzed here, three are found to belong to each of the previously identified olivine and ilmenite basalt suites, four to the pigeonite basalt suite, one is an olivine cumulate, and two could not be categorized because of their coarse grain sizes and lack of appropriate mineral phases. Our approach introduces methods that can be used to investigate small sample sizes (i.e., fines) from future sample return missions to investigate lava flow diversity and petrological significance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016. Vol. 51, 1654-1677 p.
Keyword [en]
Moon, lunar basalt, Apollo 12
National Category
Geology
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-1876DOI: 10.1111/maps.12689OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-1876DiVA: diva2:1044294
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0097Swedish Research Council, VR 621-2012-4370
Available from: 2016-11-02 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2016-11-03Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/maps.12689/full

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Snape, Joshua
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