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Prediction of the effects of friction control on top-of-rail cracks
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9723-2881
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Number of Authors: 4
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part F, journal of rail and rapid transit, ISSN 0954-4097, E-ISSN 2041-3017, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Rolling contact fatigue is a major problem connected with railway tracks, especially in curves, since it leads to highermaintenance costs. By optimising the top-of-rail friction, the wear and cracks on the top of the rail can eventually bereduced without causing very long braking distances. There are several research articles available on crack prediction,but most of the research is focused either on rail without a friction modifier or on wheels with and without frictioncontrol. In the present study, in order to predict the formation of surface-initiated rolling contact fatigue, a range offriction coefficients with different Kalker’s reduction factors has been assumed. Kalker’s reduction factor takes care ofthe basic tendency of creepage as a function of the traction forces at lower creepage. The assumed range covers possiblefriction values from those for non-lubricated rail to those for rail with a minimum measured friction control on the top ofthe rail using a friction modifier. A fatigue index model based on the shakedown theory was used to predict thegeneration of surface-initiated rolling contact fatigue. Simulations were performed using multi-body simulation, forwhich inputs were taken from the Iron Ore line in the north of Sweden. The effect of friction control was studiedfor different curve radii, ranging from 200 m to 3000 m, and for different axle loads from 30 to 40 tonnes at a constanttrain speed of 60 km/h. One example of a result is that a maximum friction coefficient (m) of 0.2 with a Kalker’s reductionfactor of 15% is needed in the case of trains with a heavy axle load to avoid crack formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. 1-11 p.
Keyword [en]
Rolling contact fatigue, fatigue index, friction modifier, friction control, rail
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Operation and Maintenance
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-60052DOI: 10.1177/0954409716674984OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-60052DiVA: diva2:1043695
Projects
top of rail project
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2016-12-02

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Khan, Saad AhmedLundberg, JanStenström, Christer
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Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics
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Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part F, journal of rail and rapid transit
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specifiedOther Civil Engineering

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