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Cognitive hearing aids? Insights and possibilities
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre. (Technical audiology)
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
2014 (English)In: Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception: Proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing / [ed] K. Domenica Karavitaki and David P. Corey, Melvilla, New York: American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2014, Vol. 1703, 3 p.090001-1-090001-4 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The working memory plays an important role in successfully overcoming adverse listening conditions andshould consequently be considered when designing and testing hearing aids. A number of studies have established therelationship between hearing in noise and working memory involvement, but with the Sentence-final Word Identificationand Recall (SWIRL) test, it is possible to show that working memory is also involved in listening under favorableconditions and that noise reduction has a positive influence in situation with very little noise. Although the capacity of theworking memory is a finite individual size, its involvement can differ with fatigue and other factors and individualizationof hearing aids should take this into account to obtain the best performance. A way of individually adapting hearing aidsis based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from usingEEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization ofhearing aids. Such an adaptation could be done based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here wepresent the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG thatcan be explored for individualization of hearing aids.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melvilla, New York: American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2014. Vol. 1703, 3 p.090001-1-090001-4 p.
Series
, AIP conference Proceedings, ISSN 0094-243X ; 1703
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132159DOI: 10.1063/1.4939399ISBN: 9780735413504OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-132159DiVA: diva2:1038593
Conference
12th international Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception, 23–29 June, Cape Sounio, Greece
Available from: 2016-10-19 Created: 2016-10-19 Last updated: 2016-10-20Bibliographically approved

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Petersen, Eline BorchLunner, Thomas
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Division of Neuro and Inflammation ScienceFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesDisability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability Research
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