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Adaptive evolution of seed oil content in angiosperms: accounting for the global patterns of seed oils
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Picardie Jules Verne, FRE CNRS 3498, Unite Ecol & Dynam Syst Anthropises EDYSAN, 1 Rue Louvels, FR-80037 Amiens, France..
Univ Picardie Jules Verne, FRE CNRS 3498, Unite Ecol & Dynam Syst Anthropises EDYSAN, 1 Rue Louvels, FR-80037 Amiens, France..
2016 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 16, 187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies of the biogeographic distribution of seed oil content in plants are fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of adaptive evolution in plants as seed oil is the primary energy source needed for germination and establishment of plants. However, seed oil content as an adaptive trait in plants is poorly understood. Here, we examine the adaptive nature of seed oil content in 168 angiosperm families occurring in different biomes across the world. We also explore the role of multiple seed traits like seed oil content and composition in plant adaptation in a phylogenetic and nonphylogenetic context. Result: It was observed that the seed oil content in tropical plants (28.4 %) was significantly higher than the temperate plants (24.6 %). A significant relationship between oil content and latitude was observed in three families Papaveraceae, Sapindaceae and Sapotaceae indicating that selective forces correlated with latitude influence seed oil content. Evaluation of the response of seed oil content and composition to latitude and the correlation between seed oil content and composition showed that multiple seed traits, seed oil content and composition contribute towards plant adaptation. Investigation of the presence or absence of phylogenetic signals across 168 angiosperm families in 62 clades revealed that members of seven clades evolved to have high or low seed oil content independently as they did not share a common evolutionary path. Conclusion: The study provides us an insight into the biogeographical distribution and the adaptive role of seed oil content in plants. The study indicates that multiple seed traits like seed oil content and the fatty acid composition of the seed oils determine the fitness of the plants and validate the adaptive hypothesis that seed oil quantity and quality are crucial to plant adaptation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 16, 187
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Botany Evolutionary Biology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-305467DOI: 10.1186/s12862-016-0752-7ISI: 000383147600003PubMedID: 27613109OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-305467DiVA: diva2:1038559
Available from: 2016-10-19 Created: 2016-10-18 Last updated: 2016-10-19Bibliographically approved

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Sanyal, Anushree
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