Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
The Genetics of How Dogs Became Our Social Allies
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2329-2635
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1262-4585
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Current directions in psychological science (Print), ISSN 0963-7214, E-ISSN 1467-8721, Vol. 25, no 5, 334-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dogs were domesticated from wolves about 15,000 years ago, and an important selection pressure (intentional orunintentional) has been their ability to communicate and cooperate with people. They show extensive human-directedsociability, which varies within as well as between breeds and is not shared by ancestral wolves. Hence, dogs arepotentially ideal models for studying the genetics of social behavior. Here, we review some recent research carried outby us and others on this subject. We present results showing that recent selection of different breed types can be usedas a model system for investigating the genetic architecture of personalities. Furthermore, we review data showingthat human-directed social behavior is significantly related to a small number of genes that have known connectionsto human social disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. We suggest that dogs are excellent study subjects foranalyzing the evolution and genetics of social behavior and can serve as probes for human health and welfare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016. Vol. 25, no 5, 334-338 p.
Keyword [en]
genetics, social behavior, canids, breed, welfare
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131860DOI: 10.1177/0963721416657050ISI: 000385952500007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-131860DiVA: diva2:1034108
Note

Funding agencies: European Research Council [322206]

Available from: 2016-10-11 Created: 2016-10-11 Last updated: 2016-11-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(174 kB)23 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 174 kBChecksum SHA-512
22311e6c5e533806581d15d2bd0effb19c9907427987a5ce1e3bfea1f3e75aa19da62c1e248d1655fc090afa3789e6d1dcc360356494b967d3f56920e1f8e2bf
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jensen, PerPersson, Mia EWright, DominicJohnsson, MartinSundman, Ann-SofieRoth, Lina S. V.
By organisation
BiologyFaculty of Science & Engineering
In the same journal
Current directions in psychological science (Print)
Genetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 23 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 22 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link