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'Doggy-biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9902-1191
2017 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, no 2, 240-266 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article, we turn to literatures that advance Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family – the First Dog called Bo Obama. With analytical focus on vitalisation efforts, we follow the construction of Bo in various outlets, such as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades and the negotiation thereof show how contemporary biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities. We discuss ‘cuddly management’ in relation to Foucauldian scholarship within organisation and management studies and propose that the construction of Bo facilitates interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference circumscribed by vitalisation efforts that we pinpoint as ‘doggy-biopolics'.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 24, no 2, 240-266 p.
Keyword [en]
Animal Studies, domestic animals, First Dog, management techniques, Michel Foucault, posthuman biopolitics, US governing
National Category
Engineering and Technology Sociology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-304657DOI: 10.1177/1350508416666938ISI: 000398040100006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-304657DiVA: diva2:1033382
Available from: 2016-10-06 Created: 2016-10-06 Last updated: 2017-04-25Bibliographically approved

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