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The character of the suspended and dissolved phases in the water cover of the flooded mine tailings at Stekenjokk, northern Sweden
Luleå University of Technology.
Luleå University of Technology.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
2000 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 247, no 1, p. 15-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies of the suspended and dissolved phases of the pond water, material collected from sediment traps, and surficial sediments/tailings from the flooded tailings pond at Stekenjokk have been performed. The aim was to characterise the material, to study the seasonal variations and to quantify possible resuspension of the tailings in the pond. The element concentrations in the pond at Stekenjokk seem to be largely controlled by processes controlling the precipitation and dissolution of Mn- and Fe-oxyhydroxides in both the water column and in the surficial tailings. Physiochemical processes such as weathering of silicates on the surrounding mountain slopes or dykes contributes both dissolved elements and detrital particles. The suspended phase consists of detrital silicate material as well as Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. The average heavy metal concentrations are high, e.g. 0.42% Cu, 0.15% Pb and 3.1% Zn, which is probably due to sorption onto Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. The suspended phase is richer in Fe, and particularly Mn, during the winter. The suspended phase resembles the material collected in sediment traps and the material in the surficial sediments. The pond water is well mixed during the ice-free season. The dissolved heavy metal concentrations are generally rather low with, e.g. maximum concentrations of 2.03 μg/l Cu, 0.23 μg/l Pb and 268 μg/l Zn during the winter. Higher dissolved concentrations are found below the ice-cover above the sediment surface during the winter, caused by diffusion of elements from the sediment-water interface up into the pond water. Most of the metals occurring in the pond are dissolved and resuspension of tailings is negligible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 247, no 1, p. 15-31
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10610DOI: 10.1016/S0048-9697(99)00454-4ISI: 000085519900002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0033984782Local ID: 970a6760-5bb2-11dc-a955-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10610DiVA, id: diva2:983555
Note
Validerad; 2000; 20070905 (bajo)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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