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Evidence for indigenous nitrogen in sedimentary and aeolian deposits from the Curiosity rover investigations at Gale crater, Mars
Solar System Exploration Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, Maryland.
Jacobs Technology, Inc., Johnson Space Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, Texas.
NASA Postdoctoral Program, Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, Maryland.
Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico D.F..
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Number of Authors: 23
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 14, 4245-4250 p., 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover has detected oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds during pyrolysis of scooped aeolian sediments and drilled sedimentary deposits within Gale crater. Total N concentrations ranged from 20 to 250 nmol N per sample. After subtraction of known N sources in SAM, our results support the equivalent of 110–300 ppm of nitrate in the Rocknest (RN) aeolian samples, and 70–260 and 330–1,100 ppm nitrate in John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) mudstone deposits, respectively. Discovery of indigenous martian nitrogen in Mars surface materials has important implications for habitability and, specifically, for the potential evolution of a nitrogen cycle at some point in martian history. The detection of nitrate in both wind-drifted fines (RN) and in mudstone (JK, CB) is likely a result of N2 fixation to nitrate generated by thermal shock from impact or volcanic plume lightning on ancient Mars. Fixed nitrogen could have facilitated the development of a primitive nitrogen cycle on the surface of ancient Mars, potentially providing a biochemically accessible source of nitrogen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 112, no 14, 4245-4250 p., 6
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9069DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1420932112Local ID: 7a132be9-52a6-4180-8678-bf37262cdf91OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9069DiVA: diva2:982007
Note

Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150327 (ninhul)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-10-19Bibliographically approved

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